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Life Insurance Rate Classifications (Canadian)
Dropping Term Life Insurance Rates

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# Friday, 24 February 2006
Friday, 24 February 2006 15:55:24 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00) ( General Life | Mortgage Insurance | Term Life | Whole Life )

Most Canadian life insurance companies use a 5-level health classification system, with the least expensive at the top and more expensive with each level drop in classification.

These classifications are generally as follows:

  1. Class # 1: non-smokers, only 5% of the general population qualifies for this rating. To qualify for this life insurance rate you have to be in fantastic shape and health.
     
  2. Class # 2: non smokers, about 20% of the general population qualifies. To qualify for this rate you have to be in above average shape and health.
      
  3. Class #3: 50% of non smokers qualify for this rate. The majority of the population qualifies.
      
  4. Class #4: Smokers (non-tobacco and non-marijuana users) may qualify for this rating.
     
  5. Class # 5: Cigarette smokers qualify for this rate.

Note:

  • Most life insurance companies will not accept marijuana users even if usage is for medically approved reasons.
     
  • If you quit smoking for one year , you can re-apply to most insurance companies and be granted a non-smoker rating.
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# Thursday, 16 February 2006
Thursday, 16 February 2006 16:49:04 (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00) ( General Life | Mortgage Insurance | Term Life )

Term life insurance rates have been dropping in Canada for the last 10 years or so, due to a variety of reasons.

People are living longer, for one. Smoking, and the overall use of tobacco products has decreased, and rate decreases have been particularly significant for non-smokers.

Another reason is competition, which results in a lowering of premiums. An additional advantage of this is an increasing number of choices as far as term life products available to the public.

In fact, term life premiums are so low that many times we run into cases where people actually save a substantial amount of money by switching their bank mortgage insurance to a term life insurance policy.

For example, a 10-year term for $250,000 for a non-smoking, 25-year old female can cost as low as $125 annually, or $12 monthly (these are preferred rates).

But what about the future trends? Term rates seemed to have leveled out, and it is difficult to say if they will remain the same or start increasing.

If you are considering buying life insurance the time to act is now, while you are healthy and the premiums are low!

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